All The Time In The World

Disconnecting to reconnect.

Director Suzanne Crocker’s documentary chronicling her family’s experiences when they went ‘off the grid’ in 2010 in the Yukon wilderness for nine months is as fascinating and inspiring as it sounds.

Poster art for All The Time In The WorldWith an increase in alarming news reports about the downside of social media and how our reliance on technology is disconnecting us from reality, this beautifully photographed account of the Dawson City mom’s ‘simple life’ with her husband Gerard, their three children, two cats and a dog, is also timely.

For nine months, the family lived in a remote cabin with no electricity, no running water – and certainly no tv or internet. With no neighbours for hundreds of kilometres, the children’s only friends were each other, and their classroom was the great outdoors.

Although Crocker admits she feared they would ‘drive each other crazy,’ there was rarely a dull moment. The same can be said of her film, which engagingly illustrates how the resourceful family’s activities, such as baking bread, making up games, puzzles and stories, going skating and reading books aloud, brought them closer together as they became ‘present in the moment’ without the clock.

Their chronicle is as wholesome (and occasionally suspenseful) as the liberating wilderness adventures Crocker experienced with her husband and their children, whose priceless candid commentary adds humour to the film’s stunning northern vistas, sunsets and other natural wonders.

– Michael D. Reid, The Victoria Times-Colonist